Adventure travel to the edge of the world

All stations operate in New Zealand

Manor Pool at Flock Hill Station in New Zealand’s South Island

Flock Hill Station was founded in 1857 in the depths of the Southern Alps on the South Island of New Zealand. This incredibly scenic, rugged part of the country has replaced Narnia on the big screen, and it’s easy to see why; there is no need to erase the traces of modern civilization in post-production when they are almost non-existent among 36,000 acres of range and riverbeds and miles of wild grassland.

Cottage with four bedrooms, glass and wood
Cottage with four bedrooms, glass and wood

Next month, the station’s owners will start welcoming guests to The Flockhill Homestead, a new four-bedroom, glass and timber home nestled deep in an empty part of the station, a 20-minute drive from the Great Alpine Highway, already one of the country’s longest. the most idyllic roads. From bouldering to fly fishing (not one, but two of the island’s main salmon spawning streams run through the area) to night sky watching, Active New Zealand has everything to offer. Alpine and glacier picnics, yes; helicopters to get to them, of course. Skiing and fleece (in season): sign up. From NZ$12,000 (approx. £6,200), flockhillnz.com


Northern Lapland is a woodcutter’s delight

View of and around Loggers Lodge

View of and around Loggers Lodge © Tanveer Badal

“Welcome to life at 66 degrees north” is the slogan of Loggers Lodge, located in that blissfully lonely latitude in the far north of Swedish Lapland. The house, on two acres of private land, was originally built in the 19th century to house journeymen who transported logs downstream to sawmills on the coast. Outside, everything is the same as then: cheerful red paint, white gables and a chimney. A recent renovation has brought the interior fully into the 21st century: the master bedroom, dominated by a central fireplace, still has wooden walls and a pitched roof, but the space has been enlarged and a large and very indulgent bathroom has been added. , all-black granite and a high-tech shower. It is connected to the new sauna, which is housed in its own little cabin.

“No light, no pollution and endless silence”: Loggers Lodge © Tanveer Badal

And good news for families, friends and couples traveling together: a second private bedroom has been built – a modern cube with thermal ash flooring and glass walls with its own seating area, which can be configured for adults or children to sleep. No light, no pollution and endless silence are included. From £3,900 for two nights, loggerslodge.com


Throwback in Chilean Patagonia

Fishing in the Desert by Martin Pescador
Fishing in the Desert by Martin Pescador

Chilean Patagonia is one of the largest natural landscapes in the southern hemisphere; Eleven, America’s elite adventure outfitter, has been here for years, so they know the lies on the ground. His newest offering, launched this fall, is a weeklong fishing trip that takes in a pair of lodges in the desert southeast of Chaiten known as Martin Pescador, which between them provide access to two separate watersheds with world-class trout fishing. known.

Lodge and cabins in Puerto Cardenas

Lodge and cabins in Puerto Cardenas

In Puerto Cardenas, guests stay in private cabins with open boat access to the best of Rio Yelcho and Lago Yelcho; La Junta, further south, is a traditional house with five bedrooms and a corner; there are world-class rainbows and brook trout in abundance (also the odd salmon). From $7,612 for seven nights, elevenexperience.com


An unexpected trip to the south of Morocco

Road on the Route of Memory

Road on the Memory Route © Thierry Teyssier

If you want to draw real magic from remote coordinates, you should entrust your journey to a professional magician. In Morocco, that man has long been Thierry Teissier, event planner, theater producer and owner of Dar Ahlam, an extraordinary hotel in the oasis of Skoura that remains a benchmark of ambiance and elegance nearly 20 years after it first opened. In 2015, he created the Route de la Memoire, a six-day off-road and off-road odyssey that scours the country’s spectacular south in search of its emptiest and most inviting corners. He spent years researching the route, finding ancient homes in hidden oases and mountaintop villages along some 1,000 kilometers; they have been converted into beautiful, fully equipped guest rooms.

One of the garden rooms in Dar Ahlam

One of the garden rooms in Dar Ahlam

There are picnic stops by the ocean on the Route de la Memoire

There are picnic stops by the ocean on the Route de la Memoire

The days are marked by impromptu stops on empty Atlantic beaches, deserted wadis and abandoned forts that once, millennia ago, criss-crossed thriving trade routes; guests come across cold towels and tea, a few rugs and cushions, sometimes a bivouac with a light lunch and a bottle semolina wine waiting for them (how did it get there? The scale and detail of the production is a bit impressive). Every night you drive through landscapes that seem almost forgotten by time, only to pull up to “abandoned” ruins and find outside the door lit grills, cool sheets and hospitality that seems to have been invented out of thin air. . From 6,000 euros for six nights, darahlam.com

@mariashollenbarger

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