Thief leaves leaflets on cars asking for donations

Is Extortion the Solution? That’s the question Marcia Saefan had when she found a note on her windshield while parked outside the University of San Francisco. Watch the video above to learn more about this story. The postcard says: “I don’t want to STEAL anymore! But I still have bills to pay. Can you help me?” Next, the person lists three modern payment methods: Cash App, Bitcoin and Paypal. “Actually, I was a little bit scared, a little confused .. I didn’t know if they were going to come back to break into my car or somebody else’s car,” Saefan said. Saefan said she noticed that several cars had the same flyer. She also said the area is prone to car break-ins, especially during the holidays. Although she chose not to pay, her colleague, who also received the card, sent money. “I felt forced in a way,” Saefan said. “If I didn’t give them money, would they come back?” Cybersecurity expert Etai Maor said that this type of cryptocurrency and app crime is sometimes difficult to trace. “Bitcoin is a blockchain-based cryptocurrency,” explained Maor, who is senior director of security strategy at Cato Networks. “So while it’s impossible to know who’s behind a particular wallet, you can still follow the trail and see which transactions reached which wallet.” Paypal confirmed the account was genuine and said in part, “Any illegal behavior is a direct violation of Paypal’s user rules.” agreement and any violations of this nature will result in account termination.” San Francisco police said this is the first time they have seen this criminal approach, but confirmed that San Francisco is experiencing a surge in car theft. “Compared to last year, the increase in vehicle burglaries and thefts or larcenies occurring at any retail location is approximately 16% higher than last year,” said the San Francisco Police Department. Public Information Officer Robert Rueca .

Extortion – the way out?

That’s the question Marcia Sefan asked when she found a note on her windshield while parked outside the University of San Francisco.

Watch the video above to learn more about this story

The flyer reads, “I don’t want to STEAL anymore! But I still have bills to pay. Can you help me?”

Next, the person lists three modern payment methods: Cash App, Bitcoin and Paypal.

“I was actually a bit scared, a bit confused. I didn’t know if they were going to come back to break into my car or somebody else’s car,” Saefan said.

Saefan said she noticed that several cars had the same flyer. She also said that car break-ins are common in the area, especially during the holidays.

Although she chose not to pay, her colleague, who also received the card, sent the money.

“I felt forced in a way,” Saefan said. “If I didn’t give them money, would they come back?”

Cybersecurity expert Etai Maor said that this type of cryptocurrency and app crime is sometimes difficult to trace.

“Bitcoin is a blockchain-based cryptocurrency,” explained Maor, who is senior director of security strategy at Cato Networks. “So while it’s impossible to know who’s behind a particular wallet, you can still follow the trail and see which transactions reached which wallet.”

Paypal confirmed the account was genuine and said in part, “Any illegal behavior is a direct violation of the Paypal user agreement and any violations of this nature will result in account termination.”

The San Francisco Police Department said this is the first time they have seen such a criminal approach, but confirmed that San Francisco is experiencing a surge in car thefts.

“The increase in motor vehicle burglaries and thefts or thefts occurring at any retail location is approximately 16% higher than last year,” the San Francisco Police Department said. Public Information Officer Robert Rueca.

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